Google Privacy Policy Adds Security

Author: Lisa Stephens
Published: February 01, 2012 at 8:25 pm
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Google's new policy

Google's new policies include more than just privacy. According to research, your online health is more accurately defended with added measures of association between its accounts.

Google researcher, Jessica Staddon, maintains that by portraying a more accurate and complete profile within social media and other search stats, we are "enabling better self-representation and thus more privacy-aware sharing."

Google research documents that the "evidence compatible with the conjecture that social annotations in search support privacy," will be presented next month at the 2012 ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative, the 2012 CSCW.

The research paper, entitled "Vanity or Privacy? Social Media as a Facilitator of Privacy and Trust" supports Google's decision to modify and truncate its privacy policies, and to associate relative information for participants of its services, including the automatic established authorization of Google+ accounts for users of other of Google's services.

The consolidation of Google user service accounts creates a very specific depiction of the "Googled," as it were, which not only rivals Facebook, but may enhance certain security measures over Facebook, since Google is a wide open interface, and Facebook is seemingly confined.

Rebecca Lieb, on her Altimeter Group blog post entitled, "Google’s New Privacy Policy Critical to Competition with Facebook." Altimeter Group is a research-based advisory firm which offers opinion and data discovery on new technologies. Ms. Lieb notes that it is "Funny that with all the attention directed to the Facebook IPO lately, so few commentators have made this observation." She writes this, speaking strictly in terms of Google's need to "create a unified customer profile" which should contend with Facebook.

With its stated data policy, Facebook requires its users to participate beyond more specific secure use, since Facebook inherits information which may be used, but may not, such as:

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Article Author: Lisa Stephens

Writing is my passion, it's what I love. I am a Colorado-based real estate and business consultant. Online, I am lisasepiphany ... marketing & communications, corporate PR, defined marketing strategies in an environment of best use of commercial …

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